Three Weeks Dead by Rebecca Bradley. Read October 2016.

A prequel to Shallow Waters and Made To Be Broken, but intriguingly it doesn’t focus on the main character of those two books.

“How far would you go if someone took your wife?
Especially if you buried her a week ago.”

When I read the blurb I expected to find the plot too far fetched but the author has the knack of making the characters’ actions believable. The story is fast paced and, being a novella, this is a quick read.

I enjoyed finding out more about Sally and relating it to her actions in the later books. I think Rebecca Bradley has hit on a winning idea by writing a prequel for different characters.

This was a gripping and satisfying read with elements of whodunnit and why. I’d be interested to see what this author can do with a psychological thriller rather than a police procedural.

Thank you to the author for the advance copy e-book to review.

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Tell Me No Lies by Lisa Hall. Read October 2016.

This started as a slow burn but then sparks began to fly and I was hooked.

“Don’t. Trust. Anyone. It was supposed to be a fresh start…But can you ever really start again? Or does the past follow you wherever you go…”

The story is set in London but mainly focused on the homes of the main characters and their neighbours. This gives a claustrophobic feel to the action and adds to the tension when Steph’s world starts to crumble around her. The author is skilled at (mis)directing the reader’s attention towards the various other characters involved. I lost count of the number of times I changed my mind about what was going on – a sign of an excellent mystery plot.

Steph is a brilliantly developed character. I found myself veering between compassion for the situation she has found herself in and frustration at some of her actions. Naming no names, for fear of spoilers, there are also some excellent baddies in this book.

Lisa Hall has followed up her fabulous debut, Between You and Me, with another gripping read that I recommend to all psychological thriller fans.

Thank you to the publisher for the review copy e-book via Netgalley.

Dancers In The Wind by Anne Coates. Read September 2016.

Challenges preconceptions you never even knew you were nurturing.

“Freelance journalist and single mother Hannah Weybridge is commissioned by a national newspaper to write an investigative article on the notorious red light district in Kings Cross. There she meets prostitute Princess, and police inspector in the vice squad, Tom Jordan. When Princess later arrives on her doorstep beaten up so badly she is barely recognisable, Hannah has to make some tough decisions and is drawn ever deeper into the world of deceit and violence.”

The main character, Hannah, is an independent woman juggling a writing career with child care and trying to keep afloat financially. She could have done without Princess embroiling her in a web of intrigue and danger. Hannah’s decisions and actions in the face of this drama make for a gripping and thought provoking read.

The story is set in the early 90s and the author evoked the era well. I enjoyed the author’s writing style which brings each character to life. I particularly enjoyed the development of the relationship between Hannah and Princess.

With its strong plot and the way the reader is made to doubt whether characters can be trusted, this book kept me interested throughout. I also think this story would work well as an audio book.

This book will haunt me for a while. It made me think about my own reactions to news stories and the preconceptions that can cloud your opinions.

Thank you to the publisher for the review copy e-book via Netgalley.